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Can Allergies Cause You To Cough



Can You Get A Sore Throat From Allergies And What Causes It

Yep, and how you develop it all comes down to how your body reacts when it’s exposed to an allergen like pollen. If you have allergies, your immune system will react to being exposed to an allergen by releasing histamines, chemicals that cause allergy symptoms.

For many people with seasonal allergies, those histamines can cause a stuffy, runny nose—and that can trigger post-nasal drip, i.e. mucus running down the back of your throat, explains Purvi Parikh, MD, an allergist with Allergy & Asthma Network. And that can cause irritation back there. Cue the sore throat. “Often, first thing in morning it will be worse from laying down all night,” Dr. Parikh says.

Save Your Itchy Eyes With These Allergy Eye Drops

Post-nasal drip isn’t the only reason you might develop a sore throat from allergies, though. Coughing and mouth breathing can also mess with the way your throat feels, says Kara Wada, MD, an allergist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Of course, not everyone with allergies gets a sore throat. “Allergies can affect each of us differently,” Dr. Wada says. There are some things that might make you more prone to struggling with a sore throat from allergies, Dr. Parikh says, including how severe your allergies are and the anatomy of your nose.

Symptoms Of Hay Fever

Growing seasons cause plants to bloom and molds to multiply, so you’ll usually experience your at the same time every year. The timing can help you confirm that your symptoms are due to hay fever and not a viral infection.

Symptoms associated with hay fever include:

Year-round triggers for hay fever include:

  • cockroaches
  • pet dander, such as from , , or birds
  • spores from fungi and molds that grow indoors

These allergens set off a chain reaction after they get into your system. A hay fever cough is an aftereffect of postnasal drip.

Postnasal drip occurs when allergens irritate the lining of your nose. This triggers your nasal passages to produce mucus, a sticky substance that’s supposed to remove harmful or dirty particles from the air. Mucus associated with allergens tends to be more watery than the mucus your body produces when you aren’t sick or experiencing allergies. This watery mucus drips out of your nose and down your throat. This “tickles” the throat and leads to a hay fever cough.

This cough usually comes with a constant tickling feeling in the throat. If you’re exposed to your allergen when you’re outdoors, your coughing will most likely be more frequent in the daytime.

However, your cough will generally be worse at night. This effect is largely due to gravity. During the day, you stand and sit up more than at night. Mucus can’t drain as easily at night when you’re lying down.

Does Chronic Cough Mean I Have Asthma

Although having a chronic cough can be an indication of asthma, it doesn’t mean you have asthma .

I’ve worked with my allergist for years and I’ve never had asthma, however, I did have a chronic cough.

Asthma is the result of an inflamed airway and overproduction of mucus that makes it difficult for air to pass from your mouth to your lungs. An asthma attack will occur when there is significant swelling and mucous and breathing will be laborious – a feeling of suffocation.

If you have asthma then you may experience a chronic cough and you need to be careful it doesn’t turn into an asthma attack . However, you may be experiencing a chronic cough for other reasons like post nasal drip which have more to do with your sinuses.

How To Stop Constant Coughing From Allergies

Indoor or outdoor, seasonal or year-round, all types of allergies can potentially cause constant coughing. Along with a runny nose, sneezing and watery and itchy eyes, allergic cough can be disruptive and annoying. Coughing associated with allergies is often caused by postnasal drip, when mucus from your nose runs down the back of the throat. Allergic asthma may also cause persistent coughing . With this type of asthma, symptoms are triggered by exposure to allergens, such as pollen, dust mites and mold spores.

If you are experiencing serious medical symptoms, seek emergency treatment immediately.

What Are Colds And Allergies

Cough: Allergies or COVID

They have different causes. You get a cold when a tiny living thing called a virus gets into your body. There are hundreds of different types that can get you sick.

Once a cold virus gets inside you, your immune system, the body’s defense against germs, launches a counter-attack. It’s this response that brings on the classic symptoms like a or stuffed up nose.

The viruses that cause colds are contagious. You can pick them up when someone who’s infected sneezes, , or shakes hands with you. After a couple of weeks, at the most, your immune system fights off the illness and you should stop having symptoms.

It’s a different story with . They’re caused by an overactive immune system. For some reason, your body mistakes harmless things, such as dust or , for germs and mounts an attack on them.

When that happens, your body releases chemicals such as , just as it does when fighting a cold. This can cause a swelling in the passageways of your nose, and you’ll start and .

Unlike , aren’t contagious, though some people may inherit a tendency to get them.

Steps For Managing Your Sore Throat

The first step in managing your allergy-induced sore throats is visiting a professional. From there, we can determine the root cause of your allergy, and help you create a personalized plan for removing the trigger from your life and/or ways to manage your allergies when removing the trigger isn’t a realistic solution. 

Short Term Relief

Providing short-term relief for a sore throat can usually be accomplished through the use of simple but effective home remedies. Drink warm liquids, especially tea with honey or lemon, and chicken broth or bouillon. Cold liquids can also help. Suck on Popsicles, hard candy, or throat lozenges to soothe irritation. Gargle with warm salt water several times a day. Use a humidifier or vaporizer to moisten the air. 

Long Term Relief

More long-term solutions can involve immunotherapy, which is a series of allergy shots designed to build up your body’s immune system against the allergen causing you and your body stress. 

Allergy Symptoms Vs Covid

Throughout the US, pollen has started to bloom and cause typical symptoms in those with allergies right as we have seen the spread of the coronavirus . Allergies typically cause nasal symptoms such as a runny nose and sinus congestion but do not usually result in a fever, as is found with coronavirus or the flu. While some symptoms of the coronavirus overlap with allergies, there are several differences. 

It’s important to note that this article is not intended to provide comprehensive medical advice. If you have concerns, please always contact your doctor and use general best practices. 

Learn How To Manage Symptoms

The good news is that today’s treatments for and allergies — mainly medication and inhalers — are very effective.

“They’re relatively easy to use and have minimal side effects,” Dr. Purcell says. “When symptoms are more severe or do not respond to other measures, allergy shots is very effective.”

One option that should not be on the table is letting allergic asthma ruin your quality of life. “The goal is to manage your condition so that it never limits the activities you love because they trigger an allergic reaction,” he says.

Working with your doctor will help you find a treatment plan that works for you.

Can Allergies Cause A Sore Throat

So, the short answer here is yes, Evan Li, MD, an allergist and assistant professor of medicine specializing in immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Baylor College of Medicine, tells Health. A sore throat can be from a direct inflammatory effect of allergens on the back of your throat, from mucus draining down into your throat, or from the irritating effect of coughing.

Sneezing, congestion, itchy eyes and nose, and runny nose are the most common symptoms associated with seasonal allergies, Kelly Simpson, MD, an allergist at Austin Regional Clinic in Austin, Texas, tells Health. But sore throat can also be added to that list, often caused by what’s referred to as “postnasal drip.” This is when increased mucus in the nasal passages drips down the back of the throat. As it drips down, it irritates the throat. 

“Postnasal drip, other than causing sore throat, can also cause the sensation of something getting stuck in your throat, tickling or itching in the back of your throat and also irritation that leads to cough,” Dr. Li says.

No one allergen is more prone to causing sore throat than others, but the more potent the allergen, the more likely it is to cause symptoms of allergies overall, Dr. Li says. Some of the most potent allergens are grasses, ragweed, dust mites and cat dander. 

RELATED: How to Soothe a Sore Throat Fast, According to Experts

When To Contact Your Health Care Provider

If you’ve tried all of the above and your cough continues, it’s a good idea to make an appointment with your health care provider to rule out a more serious condition. Talk to your health care provider if you have any of the followingsymptoms along with your cough:

  • Fever higher than 101°F or 38°C
  • Chills
  • Yellow or green phlegm that has a foul odor
  • Dehydration

How Is The Cause Of Coughing Up Blood Diagnosed

Since coughing up blood can range from mild to serious, it’s important to diagnose the underlying cause of your symptoms so that you can be properly treated.

Your healthcare provider will begin an exam by asking how much blood you have been coughing up, for how long and how much is mixed with mucus.

The following tests may be done:

  • A computed tomography chest scan.
  • Chest X-ray to look for tumors or fluid in the lungs.
  • Lung scan.
  • Lung biopsy.
  • Bronchoscopy to check if the airways are clear.
  • Blood count.
  • Pulmonary arteriography to see how blood flows through your lungs.
  • Urinalysis.

Seasonal Hay Fever Allergens

Common allergens associated with seasonal hay fever include:

  • Grass pollen: Some species are more likely to cause reactions, such as ryegrass, Kentucky bluegrass, Timothy grass, and Bermuda grass.
  • Tree pollen: Pollen from species such as mountain cedar, oak, mulberry, maple, western red cedar, and elm can often cause allergies.
  • Flower pollen: Ragweed, dandelion and devil’s paintbrush pollen is often allergenic, as is that of species without obvious flowers, such as lamb’s quarters.
  • Pollen from flowering bushes, trees, and shrubs: These can include sagebrush and English plantain.

Fungal and mold spores are also allergens that can lead to hay fever.

Cough Cough Sneeze Sniffle: Allergies Or Covid

What Causes Coughing? Is It An Allergy Cough Or Just A ...

Get the latest information

If you’re an sufferer, the arrival of warmer days not only signals the coming of spring, but it also means the onset of runny noses, sneezing and sniffles. If you haven’t already, you’ve probably found yourself asking, how do I know for certain if my symptoms are due to allergies or COVID-19? 

“It can be a tricky question,” says Christie Barnes, MD, Nebraska Medicine otolaryngologist. “The key is to determine whether you are having additional symptoms on top of your normal allergy symptoms.”

This Q&A answers common questions you may have this fall as you manage your allergies and concerns about COVID-19. 

Can Allergies Cause Loss Of Taste And Smell

It’s springtime, which means that seasonal allergies are in full swing. If you suffer from allergies, then you are probably used to a range of symptoms: sneezing, itchy eyes, a runny nose, and more. However, in light of the pandemic, you might also be thinking about another potential symptom. Can allergies cause loss of taste and smell, or is this always a COVID symptom? The answer can be confusing. We’ll break it down in the article below.

What About Covid

The common cold, seasonal allergies and COVID-19 all affect your respiratory system, which means they have several symptoms in common. Some of those shared symptoms include:

  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Cough
  • Headache
  • Tiredness

One of the main differences that sets them all apart is the type of cough. As we mentioned, a cold cough is wet and often produces mucus or phlegm. Allergy and COVID-19 coughs are both dry, but COVID-19 can often cause persistent coughing that can leave you short of breath.

For a closer look at how to tell the difference between other types of conditions, check out these other helpful resources:

What Can You Do

Drink warm lemon and honey – this is a tried and tested cough remedy for good reason as the warm liquid helps to soothe the throat and rid it of irritation.

Help out your immune system – the immune system is put under a great deal of strain when it’s busy fighting off allergens so it’s a good idea to help it out as best you can. You may want to take some Echinaforce Echinacea Drops  for example, which support the immune system. 

Stay hydrated – water helps to wash out any allergens that are lurking in the throat and which are therefore causing a cough. However, it also stops your throat from getting dry and irritated which would worsen a cough.

There Are Various Reasons Why You Could Be Experiencing A Cough Or Sore Throat

Post-nasal drip will also irritate your esophagus and occurs because of sinusitis or the more chronic allergic rhinitis also known as ‘Hay Fever.’ Post-nasal drip occurs when your sinuses become clogged, hence the term ‘plugged up.’ Usually, you’ll experience additional symptoms, such as nasal congestion, sneezing and a runny or itchy nose, similar to symptoms we notice when our are ‘acting up.’

Even food allergies can cause a sore throat. Generally, you’ll notice almost instant swelling and enlarging of the throat, which can quickly advance to anaphylaxis. This is a much more serious allergic reaction than an irritated throat. Often allergy medications , such as Benadryl, can have side effects such as a dry, scratchy throat, along with dry mouth. Consult a doctor before taking any medication and monitor your reactions to these types of allergy medicines.

For those with more serious allergies, symptoms can last an entire season, especially in the springtime. The flu and common cold will generally only have symptoms for a week to two weeks. If it is allergies, you will most likely also experience:

  • tiredness
  • itchy, watery eyes
  • post-nasal drip

It’s important if you are experiencing these symptoms to get tested by your local allergist. Rather than treating the symptoms, it’s best to find and treat the cause.

Could A New Medication Be Causing My Throat Clearing

Certain medications can cause throat clearing as a side effect. A class of blood pressure and heart medications called ACE inhibitors can cause coughing and throat clearing due to a buildup of substances that irritate the airways. Inhaled steroids can also cause throat clearing; in this case, the medication causes direct irritation to the larynx.

Start With Some Home Remedies For Cold And Allergy Symptoms

When you start feeling icky, some simple home remedies can provide temporary relief. For starters, try to get more rest. Both allergies and colds can cause tiredness, so listen to your body and take it easy.

Also, take advantage of saltwater to soothe irritated nasal passages and scratchy or sore throats.

For your nose, use a neti pot. A neti pot can be picked up at any local drugstore or online, and typically comes with packets to mix with warm, distilled water to create a saltwater solution to pour through your nasal passages.

For your throat, simply mix a quarter or half teaspoon of table salt into an 8-ounce glass of warm water. Take a sip and gargle for a few seconds like you would with mouthwash. Then spit and repeat until the solution is gone. You can do this a couple times a day.

Will Wearing A Mask Reduce The Spread Of Allergies As Well As Covid

In addition to reducing the transmission of respiratory droplets from individuals who may have COVID-19, wearing a mask may also help filter out some larger pollens, especially if your mask includes a small filter and you wear your mask outdoors, notes Dr. Barnes. Unfortunately, smaller pollens will still likely make their way in, even with a mask on, and will not eliminate the need to use allergy medications.

Get Your Allergies Under Control

Understanding The Symptoms Of Allergy Cough » HealthPixie

Schedule an appointment with your doctor if you’re experiencing persistent coughing that you suspect may be related to allergies. Your doctor will perform a physical examination, ask questions about your medical history and may recommend allergy testing to determine what substances are triggering your cough.

Learn More

Take the medications your doctor prescribes. Your treatment plan may include an antihistamine to reduce stuffiness, a decongestant to help dry up mucus and possibly a prescription or over-the-counter cough medicine. If you have allergic asthma, take your asthma medicines as prescribed.

Follow up with your doctor if she recommends immunotherapy, commonly called allergy shots. This treatment decreases your sensitivity to allergy triggers and, over time, can reduce your symptoms, including persistent coughing.

  • Schedule an appointment with your doctor if you’re experiencing persistent coughing that you suspect may be related to allergies.
  • This treatment decreases your sensitivity to allergy triggers and, over time, can reduce your symptoms, including persistent coughing.

Sore Throat Caused By Allergies

Got a sore throat? Allergies might be to blame. Though many sore throats can be caused by viruses, such as the common cold or flu, or bacteria such as strep throat, allergies are an over-overlooked culprit. If you suspect your sore throat might be caused by allergies, here’s what you need to know about treating the problem and alleviating the symptoms.

You Experience Shortness Of Breath

Another annoying symptom of cat allergies is feeling like you just can’t catch your breath. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America says, “Many airborne particles are small enough to get into the lungs. For some, this exposure can cause severe breathing problems. Highly sensitive people can begin coughing, wheezing and have shortness of breath within 15 to 30 minutes of inhaling allergens.”

Is It Allergies Or A Cold

Sometimes it can be hard to tell the difference between allergies and the common cold. There are more than a hundred strains of cold viruses. Each tends to become widespread at certain times of the year, which is why you may mistake a cold for a seasonal allergy. Allergies occur at the same time every year and last as long as the allergen is in the air . Allergies cause itching of the nose and eyes along with other nasal symptoms. Colds last about one week and have less itching of the nose and eyes.

Does Covid Make You Sneeze

It’s one of the most common and unanswered questions because it worries most people especially those who attend public gatherings or travel a lot. Remember, sneezing alone is quite a normal and healthy activity of our body. If you are worried and thinking about is sneezing symptom of COVID 19, then you need to understand few things first before reaching any final diagnosis. If you are also having some other symptoms along with sneezing such as cough, runny nose, headache, or shortness of breath, then you can think about COVID 19. There is no need to panic or put your mind in excessive worries because the chances of having COVID 19 while having sneezing is very less as compared to other conditions such as allergy, asthma, or flu.

Allergies Do Not Cause Fevers

People often wonder if allergies can cause a fever. The answer is no. Allergies cannot cause a fever, though you could have an allergy flare at the same time you’re experiencing a fever from another infection.

With a cold, your temperature can run warmer, but typically it will be less than 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Socan Allergies Cause Coughing Give It To Me Straight

In short, yes. Usually, create dry coughs . If that’s the case, you’ll likely have other symptoms . Headaches and wheezing often come with allergies, too, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

When Is Allergy Season 2021 Going To Start?

Timing’s also a factor. If you’re allergic to pollen , for example, you’ll likely notice symptoms almost immediately, or within an hour of being exposed. And those symptoms could last for hours after you’ve been exposed—even after the allergen isn’t nearby anymore.

Coughs related to allergies are also dependent on patterns, so doctors always try to look at the big picture. Say you get a cough every single March. That could be a sign you’re actually suffering from allergies, instead of the common cold. “You need to look at everything that’s going on,” says Paul Bryson, MD, an otolaryngologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

Your best defense for a cough from allergies? Antihistamines like Allegra, Claritin, and Zyrtec, which are all available over-the-counter. Other options include steroid nasal sprays and immunotherapy shots, which can work to regulate your body’s response to allergens, instead of just relieving the symptoms.

Can We Tell Them Apart

Fever, sore muscles or muscle weakness

Hayfever, despite its name, does not cause increased body temperature. Flu-like illnesses do cause fever, and sore muscles , malaise and fatigue.

Allergies such as hayfever may cause a slight malaise without the other symptoms, probably due to a stuffy nose and poor sleep.

Snoring, dark circles under the eyes and sleep

The nasal congestion from hayfever and other types of rhinitis often increases the potential to snore during sleep. And if you have those dark circles under the eyes, that’s likely down to chronic poor-quality sleep, as nasal congestion and snoring worsen.

Itchy nose and eyes, plus sneezing

An itchy nose and eyes are classic hayfever symptoms, as is intense, prolonged sneezing.

You can sneeze with a cold or flu, but usually only in the first few days of the infection.

Longer-lasting symptoms

Allergic reactions tend to come and go from day to day, or even from hour to hour, particularly if some environments are the source of the offending allergens. Perennial rhinitis can be present for weeks or months, far longer than any viral cold or flu.

It is rare for a cold to last more than a week, as the body has fought off the virus by that time. Exceptions to this are the cough and sinus symptoms that were triggered by the virus but persist for other reasons.

Antihistamines

Read more:Coronavirus or just a common cold? What to do when your child gets sick this winter

Talk With A Doctor Or Clinician To Create A Personalized Treatment Plan

Get Rid Of Dry Cough With The Help Of These Home Remedies ...

If you aren’t sure if it’s a cold or allergies, or if your symptoms are severe or long-lasting, it’s best to connect with a care provider to get an official diagnosis and treatment plan.

If your allergy symptoms are left untreated, you could become more prone to getting sinus infections or other upper respiratory infections, or may lead to poor asthma control.

Also, a common cold can turn severe. So, if your cold has had you laid up longer than a day or two, get in touch with your doctor.

You have a couple options:

Make an appointment for face-to-face care from a primary care doctor or clinician. Whether you choose a video visit or in-person appointment, your doctor will listen to your symptoms, answer questions and work with you to create a tailored treatment plan – including connecting you with an or an if needed.

Schedule an appointment

Start a virtual visit anytime, anyplace through Virtuwell. With Virtuwell, no appointment is necessary – and treatment is available 24/7. Getting started is easy. We’ll ask you a few questions, and you’ll get your diagnosis and treatment plan from a board-certified nurse practitioner. Each visit is just $59 or less, depending on your insurance.


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