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HomeHealthCan You Get A Sinus Infection From Allergies

Can You Get A Sinus Infection From Allergies

Can Sinus Infections Or Sinusitis Be Prevented

How to Get Rid Sinus Infections, Colds, and Allergies at home -remedies

Currently, there are no vaccines designed specifically against infectious sinusitis or sinus infections. However, there are vaccines against viruses and bacteria that may cause some infectious sinusitis. Vaccination against pathogens known to cause infectious sinusitis may indirectly reduce or prevent the chance of getting the disease however, no specific studies support this assumption. Fungal vaccines against sinusitis are not available, currently.

If you are prone to recurrent bouts of a yearly sinus infection it may be important to consider allergy testing to see if this is the underlying cause of the recurring problem. Treatment of the allergy may prevent secondary bacterial sinus infections. In addition, sinus infections may be due to other problems such as nasal polyps, tumors, or diseases that obstruct normal mucus flow. Treatment of these underlying causes may prevent recurrent sinus infections.

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You Have Nasal Allergies That Are Causing Your Nasal Tissue To Swell

Millions of Americans deal with nasal allergies each year. Ordon said that allergens can cause nasal tissue to swell, causing sinus infections. He recommended talking to your doctor about how to manage your allergies and keep sinus inflammation at bay.

According to Daneshrad, treatment can be as simple as avoidance of the offending allergen, such as avoiding cats, taking allergy pills or nasal sprays, or it may require allergy testing and allergy immunotherapy .

What You Need To Know About Sinus Infections

As the fall months approach, the potential for seasonal allergies, runny noses and sinus infections increases.

Sinus infections happen when fluid builds up in the air-filled pockets in the face. This allows germs to grow. Viruses cause most sinus infections, but bacteria can also be the culprit.

However, Jessica Grayson, M.D., an assistant professor with the University of Alabama at BirminghamDepartment of Otolaryngology, says many people confuse sinus infections for sinus pressure.

When people say they have sinus pressure, they may mean nasal congestion, Grayson said. Bilateral congestion could mean a person has a viral infection or an allergic reaction. Viral infections dont pick and choose a side.

Grayson adds that people who live in more humid climates like the South tend to suffer more from seasonal allergies because the humidity allows more fungus to grow, and long growing seasons allow for other trees, grasses and weeds. Living in cities can also affect people with allergies due to dust mites.

If your sinus pressure is isolated, you might have a bacterial infection, she said. Thats when you really should go see a doctor. With a virus, you just have to let it run its course.

Some people do get repetitive events, and people who work with small children, such as teachers or day care workers, are more likely to get recurrent viral infections.

Treatment

Home remedies

Jessica Grayson, M.D.That pesky flu

Aftermath

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What Is A Sinus Infection

A sinus infection, or sinusitis, occurs when the air-filled pockets in the face, called sinuses, fill up with fluid, inflaming the sinus lining and preventing them from draining. The trapped mucus can allow bacteria to grow, which leads to an infection, Melinda said.

Factors that can increase the risk of a sinus infection include:

  • Allergies
  • Swelling around the eyes, worse in the morning

Is Sinusitis Always An Infection

Natural alternatives for sinus infection

Sinusitis is usually caused by a virus and often persists even after other upper respiratory symptoms are gone. In some cases, bacteria, or rarely fungus, may cause a sinus infection. Other conditions such as allergies, nasal polyps, and tooth infections can also contribute to sinus pain and symptoms.

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How Can I Tell If I Have A Sinus Infection Cold Or Nasal Allergy

It can be difficult to tell the difference between a cold, allergies, and a sinus infection. The common cold typically builds, peaks, and slowly disappears. It lasts a few days to a week. A cold can transform into a sinus infection. Nasal allergy is inflammation of the nose due to irritating particles . Symptoms of a nasal allergy can include sneezing, itchy nose and eyes, congestion, runny nose, and post nasal drip . Sinusitis and allergy symptoms can happen at the same time as a common cold.

If you are fighting off a cold and develop symptoms of a sinus infection or nasal allergy, see your healthcare provider. You will be asked to describe your symptoms and medical history.

What Decongestants And Nasal Sprays Soothe Or Cure Sinus Infections Or Sinusitis

Taking decongestants and mucolytics orally may be helpful in assisting drainage of sinus infection.

The treatment of chronic forms of sinus infection requires longer courses of medications, such as Augmentin, and may require a sinus drainage procedure. This drainage typically requires a surgical operation to open the blocked sinus under general anesthesia. In general, antihistamines should be avoided unless it is felt that the sinusitis sinus infection is due to allergies, such as from pollens, dander, or other environmental causes.

It is likely that the use of a topical nasal steroid spray will help reduce swelling in the allergic individual without the drying that is caused by using antihistamines although both are occasionally used. Oral steroids may be prescribed to reduce acute inflammation and to help with chronic inflammation in cases with or without polyps and in allergic fungal sinusitis.

In many people, allergic sinusitis develops first, and later, bacterial infection occurs. For these individuals, early treatment of allergic sinusitis may prevent the development of secondary bacterial sinusitis.

In rare instances or in natural disasters, fungal infections may develop in debilitated people. Death rates of 50%-85% have been reported for patients with these sinus infections. Treatment relies on early diagnosis followed by immediate surgical debridement, antifungal drugs, , and stabilizing any underlying health problem such as diabetes.

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Can Taking Allergy Pills Cause Sinus Infection Pain Worse

nasal spray over-the-counter When using nasal spray to treat a sinus infection, keep in mind that prolonged use can worsen your symptoms. In addition to antihistamines and decongestants, over-the-counter medicines containing these substances can also help with sinus infections, especially if you have allergies as well.

How Is Sinusitis Diagnosed

Whatâs the Difference Between Allergies, a Common Cold, and a Sinus Infection?

Your healthcare provider will ask you a lot of questions in order to develop a detailed medical history and find out about your symptoms. They will also do a physical examination. During the exam, your care provider will check your ears, nose and throat for any swelling, draining or blockage. An endoscope may be used to look inside the nose. In some cases, you might be referred to an ear, nose and throat specialist. If you needed an imaging exam, your provider would order a computed tomography scan.

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When Do Symptoms First Appear

The symptoms of a sinus infection often come on suddenly. COVID-19 symptoms can develop more gradually 2 to 14 days after exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

A sinus infection can often happen after youve had a common viral illness, such as a cold or the flu. If your symptoms develop after youve already been sick, you may have a sinus infection.

Viruses that cause a cold or flu tend to circulate in the fall and winter months. COVID-19 can occur any time of the year. While a sinus infection could develop following COVID-19, this hasnt yet been reported by research.

A sinus infection can also occur after exposure to allergens or irritants, such as pollen, pet dander, and cigarette smoke. If you have allergies or were recently around an irritant, you may be at risk for a sinus infection.

Can Allergies Turn Into A Sinus Infection

Allergies occur when your immune system goes to war with a toxin or foreign particle in your environment. Because of the sinus inflammation and extra mucus, a bad allergy flare-up can set the stage for a sinus infection.

According to physicians with Becker ENT & Allergy, a group of allergists practicing in Philadelphia & New Jersey, you must keep your sinuses moist as you work your way out of a sinus flare-up. No matter the cause of the inflammation, dry, inflamed sinus tissue will be extremely uncomfortable and may even become more inflamed over time.

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How Are Sinusitis And Asthma Treated

Treatment is important in preventing sinusitis from worsening. Again, since the conditions are linked, treating sinusitis may have the added benefit of improving your asthma symptoms.

If you have sinusitis and asthma, your health care provider might recommend that you use:

Always ask your health care provider before using nasal spray . Overuse can lead to more congestion. You might try spraying warm salt water into the nose, or breathing in steam.

If a secondary bacterial infection has developed in your sinuses, you’ll need antibiotics. Your health care provider will probably prescribe them for about 10 to 14 days. Just remember that antibiotics will only work in cases of bacterial infection. They will not help with viruses. Also, you need to follow your health care provider’s instructions and take all your antibiotic medicine, even if you start feeling better after a few days.

For people with allergies, controlling exposure to allergens is key. Not only will it reduce your asthma symptoms, but it will also reduce your risk of sinus infections. Avoid any allergic triggers and irritants, like cigarette smoke. You can also ask your health care provider if allergy shots might be helpful.

When To Contact A Medical Professional

Allergy and Sinus Infection: Nasal Problems are Nothing to ...
  • Your symptoms last longer than 10 to 14 days or you have a cold that gets worse after 7 days.
  • You have a severe headache that is not relieved by over-the-counter pain medicine.
  • You have a fever.
  • You still have symptoms after taking all of your antibiotics properly.
  • You have any changes in your vision during a sinus infection.

A green or yellow discharge does not mean that you definitely have a sinus infection or need antibiotics.

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Is There A Right Way To Blow Your Nose

If you have a stuffy nose, trying to force yourself to blow your nose could make it worse. The best thing to do is to blow one side of your nose at a time gently into a tissue. You might want to first use some type of nasal rinse to loosen any material in your nose before blowing. Make sure you dispose of the tissue and then clean your hands with soap and water or an antimicrobial sanitizer.

Can A Cat Allergy Cause A Sinus Infection

Health related question in topics ConditionsIllness .We found some answers as below for this question Can a cat allergy cause a sinus infection,you can compare them.

Can a cat allergy cause a sinus infection

Will allergies to cats cause sinus infection?
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090709124754AAHN3hO
Yes. Unchecked allergy symptoms can turn into infections. See your doctor.

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You Have Frequent Colds That Can Cause Bacterial Growth

If you spend most of the cold season blowing your nose, you might be one of the many people who get frequent sinus infections from the common cold.

Celebrity plastic surgeon and ear, nose, and throat specialist, Dr. Andrew Ordon told INSIDER that most acute cases of sinus infections are caused by bacterial growth that occurs due to a common cold, which causes sinus inflammation that can block nasal passages.

Signs And Symptoms Of Sinus Infection Or Sinusitis

Seasonal Allergies or Sinusitis? – SLUCare Health Watch
  • Bad breath usually is due to bacterial infections
  • Itching/sneezing In noninfectious sinusitis, other associated allergy symptoms of itching eyes and sneezing may be common but may include some of the symptoms listed above for infectious sinusitis.
  • Nasal drainage usually is clear or whitish-colored in people with noninfectious sinusitis.
  • Ulceration can occur with rare fulminant fungal infections with sharply defined edges and a black, necrotic center in the nasal area. Some fungal infections cause dark, black-appearing exudates. This requires immediate medical evaluation.
  • Multiple chronic symptoms usually are a sign of subacute or chronic sinusitis
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    Sinus Trouble: Consider The Causes

    Not only can seasonal allergies or chronic allergies impact the sinuses, but humid air can cause a clogged or stuffy feeling in the nose. An infectioneither brief or long-lastingcan also take hold.

    Sinusitis ailments are not only a burden for allergy sufferers, they can be a challenge for doctors, too, especially as patients and doctors alike are on high alert for warning signs of a possible COVID-19 infection. Three of the most common causes of sinus symptoms are allergies, viral infections and bacterial infections. But these can be tough to tell apart because of overlapping symptoms.

    How Can You Prevent Sinusitis

    There’s no sure-fire way of preventing sinusitis. But there are some things you can do to lower your risk:

    • Use regular steroid sprays to prevent sinus inflammation. This is particularly important if you’ve had recurrent or chronic sinusitis.
    • Avoid allergens and irritants, if you have allergies.
    • Take your asthma medication as recommended. Keeping your asthma symptoms under control can reduce your risks of developing serious sinusitis.

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    Are Sinus Infections Common

    Yes. Sinus infections are common, affecting 31 million people in the United States. There are two main forms of sinus infections, acute and chronic either can be viral or bacterial infections. An acute sinus infection can last from 10 days to eight weeks. Chronic infection often referred to as chronic sinusitis, can last even longer and continue for months.

    Are There Different Treatments For Allergies Vs A Sinus Infection

    Home Remedies For Sinus Problems

    Yes, the treatments for allergies are different from a sinus infection, but its easy to confuse the two illnesses because the symptoms they cause are so similar. For example:

    Allergies
    Unable to blow your nose X

    Dr. Dobson comments, One of the things that I hear over and over from patients is that they have these terrible sinus infections and I think a lot of times that they seem to underplay or not fully realize the role that the allergies are playing in their sinus complaints.

    Determining the underlying cause of these symptoms is important because if you have allergies and theyre treated with an antibiotic, it wont solve the underlying issues causing all of your symptoms.

    If you have severe stuffiness related to either allergies or a sinus infection, the symptoms can be lessened with an over-the-counter or prescription decongestant. Common allergy treatments can also include antihistamines that block the immune system response.

    However, allergy medications will not eliminate the sinus infection. The first step is to understand whether the sinus infection is viral or bacterial. If your doctor believes the sinus infection is viral, you should:

    • Drink clear fluids such as broth or water
    • Rest as much as possible
    • Take over-the-counter or prescription medicines to alleviate symptoms
    • Use a saline spray to rehydrate your nasal passages

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    Can Allergies Turn Into A Sinus Infections

    Sinus infections can develop due to various reasons, including allergies. So yes, allergies can turn into a sinus infection. Allergies and sinus infections share some similarities, but also have specific symptoms.

    It is important to understand the difference between these symptoms. You may need different treatments to manage certain forms of sinus infection. There can be a lot of confusion around sinus infections, allergies, and colds. The common cold is often mistaken as allergies and vice versa. Either way, colds, and allergies could lead to a sinus infection.

    Allergies develop when your immune system overreacts to allergens. The immune system produces antibodies that identify an allergen as dangerous, even if its harmless. When in contact with an allergen, the immune system responds by attacking it. This leads to inflammation of the sinuses, airways, skin, or digestive tract.

    What Tests Diagnose The Cause Of Sinus Infections And Sinusitis

    Sinus infection is most often diagnosed based on the history and examination of a doctor. Because plain X-ray studies of the sinuses may be misleading and procedures such as CT and MRI scans, which are much more sensitive in their ability to diagnose a sinus infection, are so expensive and not available in most doctors’ offices, most sinus infections are initially diagnosed and treated based on clinical findings on examination. These physical findings may include:

    • redness and swelling of the nasal passages,
    • purulent drainage from the nasal passages ,
    • tenderness to percussion over the cheeks or forehead region of the sinuses, and
    • swelling about the eyes and cheeks.

    Occasionally, nasal secretions are examined for secreted cells that may help differentiate between infectious and allergic sinusitis. Infectious sinusitis may show specialized cells of infection while allergic sinusitis may show specialized white blood cells of allergy . Physicians prescribe antibiotics if the bacterial infection is suspected. Antibiotics are not effective against viral infections many physicians then treat the symptoms.

    In addition, both rigid and flexible endoscopy has been used to obtain diagnostic material from sinuses. These procedures are usually done by an otolaryngologist under topical and local anesthesia. Occasionally, there may be a need to sedate the patient. Some investigators suggest that endoscopy specimens are comparable to those obtained by needle puncture.

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