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Do Seasonal Allergies Cause Cough

Is Coughing A Symptom Of Allergies

Seasonal allergies or COVID-19? Doctor explains differences

If you have a chronic cough, youre not alone. Coughing is a symptom of seasonal allergies, and more than 50 million Americans deal with allergies every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1 . Once you identify allergies as your coughs source, your doctor can recommend various medications to treat it.

The Difference In Duration Of Symptoms

Typically, a cold lasts for around seven to 10 days, with the most severe symptoms beginning to improve after a few days. Allergies, however, if left untreated, will cause symptoms for as long as the allergen is present. So, if your cough doesnt start to get better after a week, your symptoms may not be caused by a cold.;

Asthma, on the other hand, can come and go quickly. Attacks may come on suddenly and subside quickly. Mild episodes may last for minutes, but more serious attacks can last for days.;

What About Herbal Remedies

Herbal remedies can either be taken to treat seasonal allergies at the root of your cough, or be taken to treat the individual symptom.

For example, Pollinosan Allergy Relief Tablets;combines several different herbs designed to reduce inflammation of the mucous membranes which occurs as the body reacts to pollen. Unlike some conventional seasonal allergies treatments, Pollinosan does not cause drowsiness.

If you are looking for a specific remedy for coughs, A.Vogel’s Soothing Cough Syrup containing extracts of spruce can help to ease a dry or tickly cough whilst Bronchosan may help with a mucous cough.

Read Also: Is Celiac Disease And Gluten Allergy The Same

Which Allergy Medicine Is Best For Hay Fever

If youve lost your voice due to allergies, the best way to recover is by treating the allergy itself.;;

Here are some natural antihistamines for singers;;

  • Vitamin C Found in citrus fruits, strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, bell peppers, and tomatoes
  • Butterbur a plant extract that can be bought in capsule form and relieves hay fever and migraines
  • Probiotics these can be bought as supplements or capsules and have multiple health benefits. They maintain healthy bacteria in the gut and boost the immune system which can help tackle allergies
  • Quercetin found naturally in many foods and herbs, including grapes, green tea, broccoli, berries, apples, and red onions. Quercetin is thought to reduce airway inflammation caused by allergens. Taking higher doses from supplements are more effective than from flavonoids in food sources
  • Bromelain a natural remedy for sinus swelling and inflammation. It can be bought as a supplement or extracted from the core of pineapple

Here are some more ways you can boost your voice when its struggling with seasonal allergy symptoms.;;

  • Exercise for a few minutes to reduce nasal congestion;;
  • Suck honey, menthol or ginger throat lozenges to soothe throat irritation;;
  • Take a hot shower to wash off any allergens and to get steam into your vocal folds;;
  • Use a saline sinus rinse;;;
  • Use a nasal spray to ease congestion and relieve your vocal cords;;
  • Gargle with warm salt water to help your sore throat;

Debunking Myths About Seasonal Allergies And Covid

Stop Suffering From Seasonal Allergies With Oregano ...
  • Health & Wellness
  • COVID-19

The weather is finally getting warmer, and as the flowers begin to bloom individuals with asthma and allergies are feeling the effects. Mold counts are high all throughout parts of the country that have experienced unprecedented rainfall and flooding. Those of us with allergies are watching the pollen levels and mold levels rise throughout the country and experiencing the symptoms such as itchy eyes, runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, cough and even allergic asthma symptoms of wheezing and shortness of breath.

This year, these common symptoms may be even more worrisome as the COVID-19 virus continues to be top of mind across the country. Dr. Juanita Mora, American Lung Association spokesperson and allergist/immunologist at the Chicago Allergy Center, spoke with us about how to tell the difference between typical allergy symptoms and COVID-19, and how to protect yourself during this confusing time.

Q: How do allergy symptoms differ from COVID-19 symptoms?

A: Allergy symptoms typically include itchy eyes, nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, sneezing. COVID-19 symptoms may include fever, cough, chills, body aches and loss of taste or smell. Discuss with your doctor any concerns you have about new symptoms you worry could be COVID-19 or if you have been exposed to someone that currently has COVID-19. You can learn more about the symptoms of COVID-19 on American Lung Association website.

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Can Allergic Rhinitis Be Prevented Or Avoided

Allergic rhinitis cannot be prevented. You can help your symptoms by avoiding the things that cause your symptoms, including:

  • Keeping windows closed. This is especially important during high-pollen seasons.
  • Washing your hands after petting animals.
  • Using dust- and mite-proof bedding and mattress covers.
  • Wearing glasses outside to protect your eyes.
  • Showering before bed to wash off allergens from hair and skin.

You can also avoid things that can make your symptoms worse, such as:

  • Aerosol sprays.
  • Wood smoke.

Can Allergies Cause Fever

The short answer is allergies dont cause fever.; But, allergy symptoms can make you more vulnerable to a viral or bacterial infection, which can lead to a fever. So, its common to blame a fever on your allergies, even though technically that isnt the cause.

Allergies are caused when your immune system overreacts to common things in the environment such as tree and grass pollen of common dust mites in your home. The typical allergy symptoms most people experience include:

  • Coughing
  • Diarrhea or nausea are common if you have food allergies
  • Headache or sinus pain
  • Wheezing or asthma

If you have a fever, body aches, and a sore throat, its likely caused by a viral infection from a cold or flu.

Read Also: Can Allergies Cause Swollen Throat

Perennial Hay Fever Allergens

Allergens often associated with perennial hay fever include:

  • pet dander
  • the excrement, saliva, and shells of dust mites
  • spores from indoor mold and fungus
  • chemical irritants in cleaning products, such as laundry detergents
  • chemicals found in scented products, especially sprays and aerosol products
  • smoke
  • off-gasses from materials such as rubber, canvas, and leather
  • air pollution, such as car exhaust

Also, the excrement, saliva, and shells of cockroaches are highly common allergens. An estimated 63 percent of households in the United States contain cockroach allergens. In urban areas, the rates can reach 98 percent.

A 2015 study found that roughly 18 percent of children aged under 17 in the U.S. have been diagnosed with hay fever, especially in southwestern and southeastern states.

If a primary care doctor suspects that a person has hay fever, they will usually refer the person to an allergist, a doctor who specializes in allergies.

An allergist will ask questions about lifestyle habits, home and work environments, medical history, and symptoms, then perform a physical exam of the nose and throat.

What Are The Causes

What Do I Have Cold, Flu or Allergies?

Hay fever occurs when natural allergens enter the body and cause an allergic response.

Some people with hay fever develop sensitivities because of over-exposure or recurrent exposure to an allergen. Many others are born with sensitivities, or have conditions that increase the likelihood of sensitivities developing.

Seasonal hay fever tends to be caused by a different group of allergens from those that cause perennial hay fever, though some people experience both conditions.

Any foreign material can cause an allergic response. While most people are only sensitive to one allergen, others are sensitive to several, and these allergens are usually related.

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Allergy Sore Throat Treatment

So, you have a sore throat, cough, runny nose and congestion. Have you caught a common cold or do you have allergy symptoms? Sometimes, it is even difficult for doctors to distinguish between the two, because their symptoms can be so similar. If you have persistent throat discomfort accompanied by other allergy symptoms, consider that you may have a sore throat due to allergies.

Living With Allergic Rhinitis

Living with the symptoms of allergic rhinitis can affect your daily life. Nasal symptoms can be worse when lying down. This can disturb your ability to sleep well. Fatigue and headaches can affect your ability to function at school and work. There are many medicines and treatments that can help you manage your symptoms. Talk to your doctor as soon as you feel that your symptoms are getting worse or are not easy to control. He or she can help you come up with the right plan to control them so they dont affect your ability to live your normal life.

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Symptoms Of Hay Fever

Growing seasons cause plants to bloom and molds to multiply, so youll usually experience your symptoms at the same time every year. The timing can help you confirm that your symptoms are due to hay fever and not a viral infection.

Symptoms associated with hay fever include:

Year-round triggers for hay fever include:

  • cockroaches
  • pet dander, such as from cats, dogs, or birds
  • spores from fungi and molds that grow indoors

These allergens set off a chain reaction after they get into your system. A hay fever cough is an aftereffect of postnasal drip.

Postnasal drip occurs when allergens irritate the lining of your nose. This triggers your nasal passages to produce mucus, a sticky substance thats supposed to remove harmful or dirty particles from the air. Mucus associated with allergens tends to be more watery than the mucus your body produces when you arent sick or experiencing allergies. This watery mucus drips out of your nose and down your throat. This tickles the throat and leads to a hay fever cough.

This cough usually comes with a constant tickling feeling in the throat. If youre exposed to your allergen when youre outdoors, your coughing will most likely be more frequent in the daytime.

However, your cough will generally be worse at night. This effect is largely due to gravity. During the day, you stand and sit up more than at night. Mucus cant drain as easily at night when youre lying down.

Does Having Allergies Put Me A Greater Risk For Contracting Covid

Does hay fever make you cough? Signs and symptoms ...

“Having allergies does not put you at greater risk for contracting COVID-19,” says Dr. Barnes. “It’s your behaviors that put you at greater risk.”;

To reduce your risk, continue using safe practices when you are away from your home if you are not vaccinated against COVID-19. These include wearing a face mask, social distancing, limiting large social gatherings and the use of hand sanitizers and frequent hand washing.;

Also Check: How To Get Rid Of Spring Allergies

Quick Read Sneezing Season Has Begun

  • Seasonal allergies involve sneezing, post-nasal drip;and itchy, watery eyes.
  • COVID-19 symptoms are different: fever, new cough and new shortness of breath.
  • Cold symptoms can seem like seasonal allergy symptoms.
  • Flu symptoms usually involve fever, chills, and body aches, however.
  • Seasonal allergies can be caused by tree, grass or weed pollen.
  • They can worsen over time, and you can get new allergies as an adult.
  • To lessen symptoms, take non-drowsy antihistamines and use medicated nasal spray.
  • If your symptoms get worse, ask about getting allergy shots.

Now that the COVID-19 outbreak is overlapping with spring allergy season, those sniffles or that cough you normally would have dismissed are suddenly more concerning.;

Do your symptoms just mean your seasonal allergies are back? Maybe you have a cold or the flu? Or is it possible you caught the new coronavirus?

Read on to learn the differences between them and what you can do to ease your symptoms.;

How Can You Tell The Difference Between A Cold And Allergies

Both allergies and viral infections can cause symptoms like a sore throat, runny nose, headaches, and congestion. So how can you tell whats actually making you feel crummy?

How your symptoms begin are often a big clue: Colds tend to creep up slowly, while allergy symptoms usually flare up shortly after youre exposed to an allergen, per the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. If you start to notice itching, stuffiness, or an annoying tickle in the back of your throat after spending some time outside, for instance, youre probably dealing with allergies.

Other clues to watch for: If your sore throat tends to get worse or makes it hard to swallow, or you develop a fever, chills, or body aches, youre probably dealing with a cold or infection, Dr. Mehdizadeh says. If your allergy medications dont seem to be helping, thats also a sign it could be a cold, flu, COVID-19, or something else.

The bad news? Colds and allergies can exist at the same time, Dr. Reisacher says. So if you cant figure out what youre dealing with, talk with your doctor.

Also Check: Can Allergies Cause Asthma Attacks

Socan Allergies Cause Coughing Give It To Me Straight

In short, yes. Usually, allergies create dry coughs . If that’s the case, youll likely have other symptoms . Headaches and wheezing often come with allergies, too, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

Timing’s also a factor. If you’re allergic to pollen , for example, youll likely notice symptoms almost immediately, or within an hour of being exposed. And those symptoms could last for hours after you’ve been exposedeven after the allergen isn’t nearby anymore.

Coughs related to allergies are also dependent on patterns, so doctors always try to look at the big picture. Say you get a cough every single March. That could be a sign you’re actually suffering from allergies, instead of the common cold. “You need to look at everything that’s going on,” says Paul Bryson, MD, an otolaryngologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

Your best defense for a cough from allergies? Antihistamines like Allegra, Claritin, and Zyrtec, which are all available over-the-counter. Other options include steroid nasal sprays and immunotherapy shots, which can work to regulate your body’s response to allergens, instead of just relieving the symptoms.

Dont Freak Out If Allergies Get Worse

Seasonal Allergies or Sinusitis? – SLUCare Health Watch

Due to fluctuations in pollen levels every year, its totally normal if your allergies are mild one year and then worse the next, Rampur says.;

But what if youve never had seasonal allergies before and you suddenly get them? This is also common.

First, if youve recently moved to the area, you could develop allergies as your immune system adjusts to the new pollens youre exposed to. Typically how this works is your allergies wont develop until your second or third year in a new place, Ayars says.

If other people in your family have allergies, its possible you will develop them at some point, too. While its more common for allergies to begin developing in childhood or ones teenaged years, Ayars still sees plenty of patients who start getting a new allergy in adulthood.

Another thing that could make you more susceptible to seasonal allergies is having another medical condition linked to your immune system, such as asthma or eczema. ;

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Its Important To Minimize Exposure

Allergy testing can help identify whats triggering your allergies. Additional testing can help to confirm a diagnosis of asthma.

Once you know you have allergic asthma, identifying and avoiding its triggers will help you control your symptoms.;When possible, take measures to prevent or minimize exposure,;advises Dr. Purcell.

The same methods wont work for all allergy triggers.;For example, dust mites are not airborne but cat and dog dander is, he says.

To reduce allergens in your home, Dr. Purcell recommends:

  • Minimizing or eliminating pet exposure.
  • Using special dust mite covers on bedding and aiming for indoor humidity levels of 35 percent to minimize dust mite exposure.
  • Eliminating food sources for cockroaches by using sealed food containers and regularly cleaning kitchen floors and surfaces.
  • Changing clothes and showering after you come inside if;youre allergic to pollen, and closing doors and windows when pollen counts are high.

Although mold is more of an outdoor allergen, it can develop indoors .;Addressing the water leak, then using a diluted bleach solution or a commercial cleaning product is usually sufficient, says Dr. Purcell.

Extensive mold intrusion may require a professional mold removal service.

Keep Your Asthma In Check

While difficulty breathing and shortness of breath have been symptoms associated with coronavirus, it can also be signs of asthma that can flare up with the allergy season. If you dont have a fever present with these symptoms, asthma could be the culprit.

People with asthma need to stay on top of their treatment, says Dr. Benninger, especially since people with respiratory issues are at a higher risk of potentially severe illness from coronavirus. Whether its inhalers or nasal sprays, its important to be up to date on their medication and proper usage.;

Dr. Benninger also recommends starting allergy medications early in the allergy season rather than waiting for the worst part.

If you can prevent the symptoms from worsening, then youre much more likely to have less difficulty when you get to the time of the season when allergies tend to get out of control, he says.

Read Also: What Is In Mucinex Allergy

Back Up: Why Do We Cough Anyway

Coughing is a natural response to irritation in your throat or airways. To put it simply, receptors in the throat, trachea, and lungs respond and lead to activation of the cough center in the brain, explains Clifford Bassett, M.D., founder and medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of New York.

Coughing is an essential defense mechanism, he says, and its your bodys way of pushing any unwanted stuff out, including pollen, mucus, and pieces of food, to make more room for air to get through.

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